Eucalyptus Radiata for Dogs & Horses

May 16th, 2016

Written by e3 guest blogger:
Jill Barker, Animal Health Advisor & Bodyworker

jill Barkere3 benefits from Jill’s vast knowledge of the use of essential oils to help many kinds of animals. Jill’s experience is in animal energetic bodywork, neuromuscular re-patterning and injury recovery.
She has found aromatherapy to be an amazing therapeutic tool, allowing both humans and animals to return to a natural healthy balanced state of being.


Eucalyptus Radiata for Dogs & Horses
(Do Not with cats, birds, fish, reptiles or small mammals i.e. Rabbits, Guinea Pigs, Rats, Mice, Hamsters, Ferrets, Gerbils etc.)

Latin name: Eucalyptus radiata
Country of origin: Australia
Part of the plant: Leaves
Extraction method: Steam distilled
Main biochemical components*:  1,8 cineole, alpha-terpineol, alpha-terpinyl acetate
In Chinese medicine Eucalyptus Radiata is considered Yang

I use Eucalyptus Radiata primarily for cooling the emotional body and taking the edge off of fear based anger.  Cooling the mind when inflamed by hot emotions and cooling the nervous system sm horse when inflamed by emotions.

I use this oil when working with an animal that is rigid, resistant or acting out because it is emotionally or mentally fearful. This can be active aggression like biting, kicking, posturing or an adamant refusal to drop the defensive position.

Eucalyptus Radiata can be sharp and strong so be respectful when introducing it to your human or animal client. Also be extremely patient, let the animal you’re helping unfold at a pace they are comfortable with. So don’t start if you can’t go gently in the moment.

I begin by unscrewing,  but leaving the cap in place; this allows the essential oil molecules to slowly drift into the air. (Reminder: animals have a heightened scents of smell so a little goes a long way.) When you see a change, as in the relaxation of muscle tension resulting in a shift in posture or a change in the animals breathing pattern, i.e. deeper or intentional breathes, then remove the cap to allow more essential oil molecules to saturate the air. Next gently move the bottle back and forth in a sweeping motion between you and the animal.

I use Eucalyptus Radiata to help the animal release fear based emotions and behavior. Using this oil will help the animal let down their guard and be more available to cooperating with you. Once you and the animal have established a connection you can begin to introduce other essential oils as you progress in your session. Go slow when you’re working with a fearful animal, there’s no need to rush, you have plenty of time.

I rarely apply this oil topically to an animal because of it’s lingering aroma and strong energetic signature. Just take the cap off and breathe. When your done recap the oil and move on to your next selection.

 

Known Qualities & Use’s:
Antibacterial, Anticatarrhal, Anti-infectious, Anti-inflammatory, Antiviral, Expectorant.sm dog

May be used for, sinus problems, asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, coughs, sore throat, mouth infections, arthritis, muscle aches and pains, muscle injuries, sprains, fever, headaches and nervous exhaustion.
Can cool, stimulate the nervous system, open sinus and breathing passages, improve circulation, refresh, revive, improve mental clarity.

Safety: 
Do not use if pregnant or nursing.

Common Names:  
Eucalyptus radiata

Scientific Name:  
E. radiata var. australiana, E. radiata ssp. radiata, E. austaliana

Botanical Family:  
Myrtaceae (Myrtle)

CAUTIONS:
If you are pregnant, nursing, using essential oils with a child, taking prescription drugs or have a major medical condition, consult a trained Aromatherapist before using essential oils.

*Chemical components: Chemical component percentages may vary. Essential 3 offers a Certificate of Analysis for review.

Photosensitizing Essential oils

May 12th, 2016

What is Photosensitivity?

woman in sun - e3 edu postEssential oils that contain coumarins and furocoumarins are often photosensitizing or phototoxic. These chemical components, found most often in expressed citrus oils, cause the skin to become more sensitive to ultraviolet light and increase the potential for the skin to burn.

Citrus essential oils can irritate skin and can some cause uneven pigmentation upon exposure to sunlamps or sunlight. Cold pressed oils such as Lime, Bergamot, Grapefruit and Lemon should be avoided.

Others essential oils that you may not realize are photosensitizers are: Angelica, Cumin, Opopanax, Rue and Verbena.

General Guidelines
General guidelines suggest if using photosensitive essential oils in leave on body products, to use in a less than 1% dilution and avoid exposure to UV light 12-18 hours after application, this includes natural sunlight and tanning beds.

You can also choose from a list of distilled citrus essential oils as the distillation process alters the chemical components or expressed citrus essential oils that naturally contain only a very small amount of the furocomarins, bergaptene or 5 methoxypsolaren (5 MOP), making them safe for topical use and UV exposure.

A few essential oil choices to consider for use in manufacturing of leave on body products:

  • Bergamot Oil (FCF) That Has the Bergaptene/Furanocoumarins removed. (Standard e3 in stock item)
  • Blood Orange Oil (Non-Standard item – e3 has in stock)
  • Lemon Oil (Steam Distilled) (Non-Standard item – item not currently in stock)
  • Lime Oil (Steam Distilled) (Non-Standard item – e3 has in stock)
  • Mandarin Oil (Standard e3 in stock item)
  • Orange Sweet Oil (Standard e3 in stock item)
  • Orange Leaf Oil aka Petitgrain (Standard e3 in stock item)
  • Tangerine Oil (Standard e3 in stock item)
  • Yuzu Oil (Standard e3 in stock item, note: over the last two years has gotten pretty pricey..)*

    (note: for pricing or to purchase non-standard items, please call or email our office 541-858-3313 or aroma@essentialthree.com)

    Recommended IFRA Maximum Usage Levels can be found directly through IFRA:
    http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/standards-library/s/phototoxicity

    Usage Recommendations Per Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

        “There is generally no phototoxic risk if the oils are used in a product that is either not applied to the body or is washed off the skin, such as shampoo, bath preparation or soap. However, essential oils can adhere to the skin if used in a sauna or steam inhalation. There is no risk if the skin to which the oils are applied is covered in such a way as to prevent UV rays from reaching them.”

        “We recommend that skin treated with phototoxic oils at levels higher than those maximum use levels, should not be exosed to UV light for 12-18 hours.”

    [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 88.]

Aromatherapy Solutions for Teenage Acne

February 25th, 2016

Teens FBIt is important to take a holistic approach when addressing issue of acne; healthy – whole food nutrition, adequate hydration, exercise, stress reduction and sleep are key components to support overall health, well-being and hormone balance.

Use gentle, natural base ingredients such as Jojoba (Jojoba is a wax ester that closely resembles the skins sebum, it has anti-inflammatory properties and will not clog pores making is especially suitable for use with acne prone skin) or Castile soap, these will help to minimize the risk of further irritating or drying the skin. Avoid frequent use of astringent products and products that contain synthetic fragrance or mineral oil.

Essential oil for teenage acne.

Cedarwood Atlas  Cedrus atlantica
Physical properties: Antiseptic, Astringent
Psychological properties: Stress, tension, anxiety, emotional exhaustion, emotional instability.

Chamomile German Matricaria chamomilla
Physical properties: Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent.
Psychological properties: Stress, anxiety, mood swings

Eucalyptus Citriodora Eucalyptus citriodora
Physical properties: Antiseptic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory
Psychological properties: Nervous tension, stress, anxiety, mild depression.

Geranium Pelargonium graveolens
Physical properties: Antibacterial, astringent, styptic.
Psychological properties: Stress, tension, anxiety, anger, fear, sleeplessness, impatience

Juniperberry Juniperus communis
Physical properties: Antiseptic, astringent
Psychological properties: Anxiety, mild depression

Lavender Lavandula angustifolia
Physical properties: Analgesic, antibacterial
Psychological properties: Stress, anxiety, mood swings, anger, sleeplessness.

Lavender Hydrosol
can be used as a skin tonic. Lavender Hydrosol is the produced during the distillation process, it is calming, soothing and balancing for the skin and can be used in products or on its own as a skin spritz/tonic.

Neroli Citrus aurantium var. amara
Physical properties: Anti-inflammatory, antibacterial
Psychological properties: Anxiety, stress, shock, mild depression, sleeplessness, lack of sense of well-being.

Petitgrain Citrus aurantium
Physical properties: Antiseptic
Psychological properties: Stress, anxiety, tension, sleeplessness, mild depression.

Rose Otto Rosa damascena
Physical properties: Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic
Psychological properties: Mild depression, stress, anxiety, irritability, tension, sleeplessness, anger, fear.

Tea Tree Melaleuca alternifolia
Physical properties: Antiseptic
Psychological properties: Nervous exhaustion, mild depression, mental fatigue

Thyme Sweet Thymus vulgaris ct. linalol
Physical properties: Antibacterial, antiseptic, antimicrobial, antifungal.
Psychological properties: Stress, mental fatigue, mental fog

Recipes

The recipes given here can be used as a guideline for proportions, substitute any of the essential oils from the list above to customize your blend.

Gentle, soothing Tea tree & Lavender spot application blend
Mix
8 drops Lavender
7 drops Tea Tree
1/2 oz Aloe Vera

Application method: Saturate the tip of a q-tip with the mixture and apply directly on the blemish.

Protocol to diminish blemish
30 drops Thyme Sweet
5 drops Chamomile German
30 drops jojoba
mix and store in small glass bottle.

Application method: At the first sign of blemish.. “wrap an ice cube in one-layer of a kitchen towel. Hold it against the spot of the pending blemish for five seconds. Pause for thirty seconds and repeat. Wait thirty seconds, pat dry, and then apply 1 drop of the essential oil mixture, exactly on the blemish.

Use the two step process 3-5 times during the 1st day, then after the first day simply apply the essential oil mixture 3-5 times per day. Decrease the number of applications, add more carrier, or discontinue if skin becomes more irritated. Avoid putting moisturizer over the blemish.” J.Keim

Acne Blend to use in Facial Wash or Facial Lotion/Oil **
8 drops Geranium
4 drops Juniperberry
6 drops Lavender
2 drops Tea Tree

Application method: Add to either 3 oz of gentle liquid soap such as a pure castile soap to use as a cleansing face and body gel or add to 3 oz of unscented moisturizing cream or jojoba to use for balancing and moisturizing skin, especially beneficial for individuals who have the classic T-zone oily skin.

Evening Moisturizer ** *
1 oz. Jojoba
4 drops Lavender
4 drops Thyme Sweet
4 drops Eucalyptus Citriodora
Mix together

Application method: After washing face in the evening apply a few drops of oil blend to face, dab off any excess oil with a tissue.

General Guidelines for Application Methods & Dilution Ratios
Body Lotion:
Add 6-30 drops of essential oil in 1 ounce of fragrance-free, natural moisturizing lotion. Apply to your skin, especially after a shower or bath.

Body Oil: Mix 6-30 drops of essential oil in 1 ounce of carrier, such as fractionated coconut oil or sweet almond oil. Apply to your skin, especially after a shower or bath.

Compress, Facial: Fill the sink with warm water. Add 1-3 drops of essential oil in the water and agitate the water to mix well. Lay in a clean washcloth, wring, and apply to face, with eyes closed, holding in place for 5-10 seconds. Repeat dipping, wringing, and applying—3 times. Pat dry.

Facial Oil: Mix 2-5 drops of essential oil in 1 ounce of carrier such as jojoba, olive oil, or rose hip seed oil.
Spot Application: Mix 1-4 drops of essential oil in 1 teaspoon of carrier oil or aloe vera and apply to the area in need.

Reference
** Recipe from – Calm Kids A guide to natural therapies for children by Jennifer Jeffries
***Recipe Adapted from Aromatherapy for the Healthy Child by Valerie Ann Worwood
Practical Aromatherapy for Self Care by Joni Keim
Research Study
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17314442 The efficacy of 5% topical tea tree oil gel in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study. Enshaieh S1, Jooya A, Siadat AH, Iraji F

Essential oil use during Chemo & Radiation therapy

August 21st, 2015

Q: Is is safe to use essential oils during chemotherapy and radiation.

A: Making specific recommendations regarding essential oil use during chemotherapy and radiation is beyond our scope of practice; the information provided in this post is intended to support you to make informed decisions. Always consult with your oncologist before incorporating essential oils into your wellness protocol.

Robert Tisserand a well known and respected aromatherapist, author and scientist has stated in his book Essential Oil Safety  “Because of possible and unpredictable effects on immune mechanisms, we recommend that essential oils are avoided from one week before to one month following a course of chemotherapy or radiotherapy.”

“The use of antioxidant essential oils during chemotherapy or radiation is controversial. While it may protect normal cells from collateral damage, it may also protect the cancer cells that the treatment is designed to eliminate. Restriction on the use of essential oils would therefore seem appropriate.”

The Myth of Frankincense Essential Oil and Cancer treatment.

Frankincense essential oil and cancer: Why EOs and chemotherapy don’t always mix
http://roberttisserand.com/2015/03/frankincense-essential-oil-and-cancer/

“Many essential oils have protective & antioxidant effects on our cells, and there is a reasonable chance that they will do the same for cancer cells – protect them from the chemotherapy – which of course would not be a good thing. This opinion is shared by many. It probably sounds odd – you’re thinking that frankincense oil should kill cancer cells and not protect them – but the only evidence for killing cancer cells (apart from one skin cancer report) comes from a few lab tests when high concentrations were used.

Moderate amounts of EO will not kill cancer cells, but could protect them. And taking large amounts of essential oil could very well interfere with the chemotherapy itself, by increasing or decreasing the concentration of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver. By causing a chemo drug to be metabolized more quickly, you reduce the duration of its effect. On the other hand if you inhibit its metabolism you reduce the efficacy of the drug. Neither of these is desirable, and chemo drugs are very carefully dosed for each patient.

For all these reasons, I suggest avoiding essential oils for one week before until one month after chemotherapy. After that time, frankincense oil may help with recovery of white blood cells, as also spearmint, dill and other essential oils.

Incidentally, almost all of the research on frankincense and cancer is on the extract, which contains boswellic acid, and not the essential oil, which does not. Frankincense extracts contain around 50% boswellic acid, which is a widely-studied antitumoral agent. However, getting such remedies to the target site in sufficient concentration to be effective is a challenge.”
Robert Tisserand

 

When using essential oils,  it is important to take into consideration the individuals age, health history, current medication, intent of use, current life circumstances such as stress, diet, hydration, sleep etc.. Choosing an essential oil, dilution ratio and application method will vary for each person.

 

 

Osteoarthritis

July 7th, 2015

handsArthritis is an inflammatory disease that affects the connective tissue in the body, especially joints; it is more common in the elderly but can occur at any age. There are over 100 types of arthritis including gout, scleroderma, lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and septic arthritis; with the two most common forms being rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Each type has a unique set of causes, symptoms and treatments. It is important to consult with your health care provider to develop an individualize treatment plan. Aromatherapy and essential oils can be used as part of a comprehensive approach to lessen symptoms and support comfort.

Osteoarthritis is often referred to as the “wear and tear” disease as it causes degeneration of joint cartilage and bone. In healthy individuals, cartilage (a slippery white connective tissue) covers the end of the bone; cartilage acts as a shock absorber and allows bones to easily slide over each other.  Once the cartilage begins to wear, bone on bone contact occurs, bone or cartilage may chip and float in the joint space, bone spurs (a bone spur is an outgrowth of bone that can occur along the edges of a bone) may occur and joints may lose their natural shape, resulting in pain, stiffness and loss of mobility.

Causes of Osteoarthritis: Age, injury, obesity, overuse, hypermobility of joints, diabetes, or other rheumatic diseases i.e. gout or RA, can all contribute to the occurrence of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis primarily affects weight bearing joints such as knees, hips, lower back, neck, fingers and thumbs.


Aromatherapy to help ease symptoms and provide comfort

There is no cure for osteoarthritis but maintaining a healthy weight and activity levels can help to slow progression and improve joint function. Warming and analgesic essential oils can be used to support ease of movement and pain reduction.

Essential Oils Suggestions:
Warming essential oils:
Nutmeg Myristica fragrans, Black Pepper Piper nigrum, Ginger Zingiber officinale and Bay Laurel Laurus nobilis

Analgesic essential oils:

Black Pepper

Black Pepper

Chamomile German Matricaria chamomilla & Chamomile Roman Anthemis nobilis, Lavender Lavandula angustifolia, Eucalyptus Globulus Eucalyptus globulus & Eucalyptus Citriodora Eucalyptus Citriodora, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Bay Laurel Laurus nobilis, Black Pepper Piper nigrum, Geranium Pelargonium graveolens, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Nutmeg Myristica fragrans, Coriander Coriandrum sativum, Rosemary Rosemarinus officinalis, Clove Bud Eugenia caryophyllata, Marjoram Sweet Origanum majorana, Plai Zingiber cassumunar, Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Niaouli Melaleuca quinquenrvia
Suggested Synergy Blend:
Joint Relief Eucalyptus Globulus, Juniperberry, Lavender, Marjoram, Sweet, Pine Needle

Application Methods:
Bath: (Moist heat may provide comfort and support increase in mobility of joints)
Mix 4-8 drops of essential oil in 1 teaspoon of carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil or 1 cup Epsom Salt. Fill the tub with warm water and immerse yourself. Add the essential oil mixture and swirl the water around you. Remain in the tub for 10-15 minutes.

Compress: (Moist heat may provide comfort and support increase in mobility of joints)
Fill a basin with warm water. Add 3-5 drops of essential oil and briskly stir. Lay in a washcloth, wring, and apply to

Tamanu

Tamanu

the area in need. Dip, wring, and apply 3 more times. Leave the last compress in place for 3 minutes.

Massage: Mix 6-30 drops of essential oil in 1 ounce of carrier oil or fragrance-free, natural lotion. Use to massage around joints where you are experiencing discomfort.
Suggested Carrier Oils: Tamanu Calophyllum inophyllum & Jojoba Simmondsia chinensis both have analgesic properties and are beneficial to use as a carrier oil or blended with other carrier oils such as Fractionated Coconut Oil Cocos nucifera.

REFERENCES

Ingrid Martin, Aromatherapy for Massage Practitioners
Aromatherapy for Health Professionals by Shirley & Len Price
Aromatherapy for Massage Practitioners by Ingrid Martin
Essential Aromatherapy by Susan & Valerie Worwood
The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential oils handbook for everyday wellness by Nerys Purchon and Lora Cantele
Anti-inflammatory properties of Bornyl acetate the main volatile constituent in numerous conifer oils
Yang H1, Zhao R, Chen H, Jia P, Bao L, Tang H.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25545915
Anti-inflammatory activity of Ocimum americanum L. essential oil in experimental model of zymosan-induced arthritis.
Yamada AN1, Grespan R, Yamada ÁT, Silva EL, Silva-Filho SE, Damião MJ, de Oliveira Dalalio MM, Bersani-Amado CA, Cuman RK.
Am J Chin Med. 2013;41(4):913-26. doi: 10.1142/S0192415X13500614.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23895160
An in-depth review on the medicinal flora Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiaceae).
Begum A1, Sandhya S1, Shaffath Ali S2, Vinod KR1, Reddy S1, Banji D2.
Acta Sci Pol Technol Aliment. 2013 Jan-Mar;12(1):61-73.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24584866
Topical dermal application of essential oils attenuates the severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats.
Komeh-Nkrumah SA1, Nanjundaiah SM, Rajaiah R, Yu H, Moudgil KD.
Phytother Res. 2012 Jan;26(1):54-9. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3509. Epub 2011 May 5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21544881
Comparative effects of two gingerol–containing Zingiber officinale extracts on experimental rheumatoid arthritis.
Funk JL1, Frye JB, Oyarzo JN, Timmermann BN.
J Nat Prod. 2009 Mar 27;72(3):403-7. doi: 10.1021/np8006183.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19216559
Antinociceptive effect and GC/MS analysis of Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil from its aerial parts.
Martínez AL1, González-Trujano ME, Pellicer F, López-Muñoz FJ, Navarrete A.
Planta Med. 2009 Apr;75(5):508-11. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1185319. Epub 2009 Jan 30.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19184968
Mayoclinic.org
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/basics/definition/con-20014868
WebMD
http://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/
 

E3 Essential Oils for Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 19th, 2015
E3 Essential Oils for RA

handsArthritis is an inflammatory disease that affects the connective tissue in the body, especially joints; it is more common in the elderly but can occur at any age. There are over 100 types of arthritis including gout, scleroderma, lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and septic arthritis; with the two most common forms being osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Each type has as a unique set of causes, symptoms and treatments. It is important to consult with your health care provider to develop an individualize treatment plan. Aromatherapy and essential oils can be used as part of a comprehensive approach to lessen symptoms and support comfort.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease. The immune system attacks the synovium (the soft tissue that surrounds the joints) causing chronic inflammation. Ligaments connecting the joints weaken, resulting in pain, degeneration and deformity due to the loss of shape and alignment of the joint.  Symptoms of RA may include pain, swelling, stiffness, fatigue, weight loss and issues with skin, eyes, lungs and blood vessels.* RA occurs more frequently in women, often presents in symmetrical pairs of joints, typically in the hands and feet, may be more disabling than other forms of arthritis and frequently contributes to feelings of anxiety and depression.

*FOR MORE INFORMATAON ABOUT the symptoms and complications of RA please refer to the following:  http://wb.md/1ylYc66

Causes
The causes of RA are unknown but it is thought that genetic predisposition and / or infection may trigger the disease. Medical treatments generally consist of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs designed to limit or slow the progression of joint damage and manage symptoms. Aromatherapy can be used to support ease of mobility and to provide comfort by helping to reduce inflammation and pain.

Essential oils for symptom relief during flare ups

Rosemary

Rosemary

Essentail Oils w/ Anti-inflammatory Properties:
Wintergreen Gaultheria procumbens, Cinnamon Leaf Cinnamomum zeylanicum, German Chamomile Matricaria chamomilla, Frankincense Boswellia frereana, Helichrysum Helichrysum italicum, Peppermint Mentha piperita, Lavender Spike Lavandula latifolia, Tumeric Curcuma longa, Eucalyptus Citriodora Eucalyptus citriodora and Cypress Cupressus sempervirens

Carrier Oils w/ Anti-inflammatory Properties:
Sweet Almond Prunis dulcis
Calendula Calendula officinalis
Jojoba Simmondsia chinensis (contains myristic acid which is anti-inflammatory)

Essential Oils w/ Analgesic Properties:
Eucalyptus Citriodora or Globulus Eucalyptus citriodora or Eucalyptus globulus
Coriander Coriandrum sativum
Lavender Lavandula angustifolia
Marjoram Sweet Origanum majorana
Peppermint Mentha piperita
Plai Zingiber cassumunar
Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis

Carrier Oils w/ Anaglesic Properties:

Tamanu Calophyllum inophyllum
Jojoba Simmondsia chinensis

Application Methods
Cool Compress – Suggested use during acute flare ups. Fill a basin with cool water. Add 3-5 drops of essential oil and briskly stir. Lay in a washcloth, wring, and apply to the area in need. Dip, wring, and apply 3 more times. Leave the last compress in place for 3 minutes.

Lotion/ Body Oil / Spot Application – Mix essential oil or blend with an all-natural lotion or carrier oil and use to massage on or around the affected joints. If there is a lot of swelling, gently massage above and below the swelling, not directly on the affected area.

Dilution Ratio
Dilution ratio will depend on overall health and the area being treated.

Dilute essential oils up to 10% for small areas i.e. fingers/toes or as low as 1 – 3 % for larger areas of the body or if used on elderly or frail individuals.

Wintergreen and Turmeric should ONLY be used in 1-3 %.
(1% dilution when used for elderly, frail individuals and for massage of larger areas of body on all individuals.)

DILUTION CHART
1 % – 1 drop of essential oil per 1 tsp. carrier oil or lotion or 6 drops of essential oils per 1 oz. carrier oil or lotion.
3 % – 3 drop of essential oil per 1 tsp. carrier oil or lotion or 18 drops of essential oils per 1 oz. carrier oil or lotion.
5 % – 3 drop of essential oil per 1 tsp. carrier oil or lotion or 30 drops of essential oils per 1 oz. carrier oil or lotion.

Calendula

Calendula

(Reminder: do not use products (lotions, creams or carrier oils) that contain mineral oil; mineral oil molecules are larger than the pores on our skin. The product will sit on top of the skin and prevent essential oil transdermal absorption. Mineral oil is also a by-product of petroleum distillation, it may contain toxins, it can clog pores and it does not contain any skin nourishing nutrients.)

Essential oils for symptom relief during non-flare up

Movement is important to maintain strength and mobility of joints; warming essential oils can be used to support ease and comfort of movement.

Warming essential oils should be used in a 1 – 5% dilution (6 – 30 drops per ounce of natural lotion or carrier oil).

Essential Oils w/ Warming Properties Suggested use 1-3 % dilution:
Black Pepper Piper nigrum, Ginger Zingiber officinale, Nutmeg Mristica fragrans, Cinnamon Leaf Cinnamomum zeylanicum
(To lessen the possibility of skin irritation, blend any of the above essential oils with other warming and/or calming/anti-inflammatory essential oils such as German Chamomile Matricaria chamomilla, Frankincense Boswellia frereana, Helichrysum Helichrysum italicum, Lavender Lavandula angustifolia.)

Essential Oils w/ Warming Properties – Suggested use 1-5 % dilution:
Bay Laurel Laurus nobilis , Cardamom Elettaria cardamomum, Coriander Coriandrum sativum, Juniperberry Junipererus communis

Application Methods
Lotion/ Body Oil / Spot Application – Mix essential oil or blend with an all-natural lotion or carrier oil and use to massage on or around the affected joints, massage affected areas prior to exercise or at the start of your day.

Foot and Hand Baths –  add 1-3 drop essential oil or blend to ¼ cup Epsom Salt or 1 tsp. carrier oil and add to a basin with warm water, soak hands or feet for 10-15 minutes.

Stress Relief

Reducing stress supports our body’s natural ability to move toward optimal health, balance and well-being.

e3 Single Essential oils for Calming & Stress Relief
Sweet Marjoram Origanum majorana (also gently warming and slightly analgesic properties)
Fragonia Agonis fragrans (also has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties)
Geranium Pelargonium graveolens
Lavender Lavandula angustifolia (also has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties)
Chamomile Roman Anthemis nobilis (also has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties)
Rose Rosa damascena or Rosa centifolia
Neroli Citrus auriantium

e3 Synergy Blends for Stress Relief
Stress Relief – Bergamot FCF, Clary Sage, Geranium, Lavender, Mandarin
Nerve Calming Blend – Bergamot FCF, Chamomile Roman, Lavender, Lemongrass, Marjoram Sweet, Petitgrain
Relax – Geranium, Lavender, Marjoram Sweet, Vetiver
Rebalance – Bergamot FCF, Cedarwood Atlas, Geranium, Mandarin, Sandalwood, Vetiver

Jasmine

Jasmine

e3 Single Essential Oils to Uplift Mood
Coriander Coriandrum sativum
Orange Sweet or Orange Wild Citrus sinensis
Mandarin Citrus deliciosa
Lime Citrus aurantifolia
Clary Sage Salvia sclarea
Jasmine Jasminum officinale

e3 Synergy Blends to Uplift Mood
Pick Me Up – Bergamot FCF, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Melissa, Orange Sweet, Peppermint
Mood Rescue – Bergamot FCF, Clary Sage, Frankincense, Lime
Revitalize – Bergamot FCF, Grapefruit, Mandarin, Orange Sweet

Application Methods
Inhalation: Put 1-3 drops of essential oil on a tissue and inhale the aroma through your nose. Pause and inhale again. (Avoid touching your nose with the tissue.)

Bath: Mix 4-8 drops of essential oil in 1 teaspoon of carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil. (You can also add the essential oil to 1/2 cup of whole milk or heavy cream.) Set aside. Adding essential oils to 1-2 cups of Epsom Salt can help to ease muscle aches. (add study? Magnesium sulfate? Fill the tub with warm water and immerse yourself. Add the essential oil mixture and swirl the water around you. Massage your skin and breathe in the aroma. Remain in the tub for 10-15 minutes.

Bath, Foot: Mix 1-3 drops of essential oil in 1/2 teaspoon of carrier oil, such as fractionated coconut oil. Set aside. Fill a tub or basin (deep enough to cover your feet and ankles) with warm water. Add the essential oil mixture, stir well, and immerse your feet for 10-15 minutes. Breathe in the aroma.

REFERENCES

Ingrid Martin, Aromatherapy for Massage Practitioners
Aromatherapy for Health Professionals by Shirley & Len Price
Aromatherapy for Massage Practitioners by Ingrid Martin
Essential Aromatherapy by Susan & Valerie Worwood
The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential oils handbook for everyday wellness by Nerys Purchon and Lora Cantele
Anti-inflammatory properties of Bornyl acetate the main volatile constituent in numerous conifer oils
Yang H1, Zhao R, Chen H, Jia P, Bao L, Tang H.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25545915
Anti-inflammatory activity of Ocimum americanum L. essential oil in experimental model of zymosan-induced arthritis.
Yamada AN1, Grespan R, Yamada ÁT, Silva EL, Silva-Filho SE, Damião MJ, de Oliveira Dalalio MM, Bersani-Amado CA, Cuman RK.
Am J Chin Med. 2013;41(4):913-26. doi: 10.1142/S0192415X13500614.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23895160
An in-depth review on the medicinal flora Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiaceae).
Begum A1, Sandhya S1, Shaffath Ali S2, Vinod KR1, Reddy S1, Banji D2.
Acta Sci Pol Technol Aliment. 2013 Jan-Mar;12(1):61-73.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24584866
Topical dermal application of essential oils attenuates the severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats.
Komeh-Nkrumah SA1, Nanjundaiah SM, Rajaiah R, Yu H, Moudgil KD.
Phytother Res. 2012 Jan;26(1):54-9. doi: 10.1002/ptr.3509. Epub 2011 May 5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21544881
Comparative effects of two gingerol–containing Zingiber officinale extracts on experimental rheumatoid arthritis.
Funk JL1, Frye JB, Oyarzo JN, Timmermann BN.
J Nat Prod. 2009 Mar 27;72(3):403-7. doi: 10.1021/np8006183.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19216559
Antinociceptive effect and GC/MS analysis of Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil from its aerial parts.
Martínez AL1, González-Trujano ME, Pellicer F, López-Muñoz FJ, Navarrete A.
Planta Med. 2009 Apr;75(5):508-11. doi: 10.1055/s-0029-1185319. Epub 2009 Jan 30.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19184968
Alexander M Aromatherapy and immunity; how the use of essential oils aids immune potentiality.
Int J Aromatherapy 2002;12(1):49-56
Pairing of essential oil scent with medication to “retrain” the immune system to react normally, using learned odor response
Mayoclinic.org
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/basics/definition/con-20014868
 

e3 Essential Oils for Dental Care

June 13th, 2015
Guest Writer: Sharon Betzler, LMT

tooth brushYesterday I returned from a dentist cleaning.  I hadn’t been in a year & a half.  The hygienist kept saying that I have virtually no plaque; very little scraping involved and I had no sensitivity, which I have always had in the past. I have huge anxiety about the dentist as visits are generally uncomfortable.  The hygenist also thought I didn’t drink coffee or tea because I have no staining (I do drink both) and the sensitivity I used to have in several teeth has gone.  The ONLY thing I’ve changed is that I haven’t used toothpaste in over 6 months!

e3 Essential Oils for Dental Care

I use an oil combination that feels good and obviously is working so much better than toothpaste; here’s my recipe:

Fill a small glass bottle (2 oz) to about 3/4 full with almond oil.

Add 30 drops e3 peppermint essential oil (food grade) – you can add a little more to taste if you want.

And 30 drops e3 protection blend oil (food grade)

Shake it up & pour on toothbrush or sometimes it’s easier to put a little in a small paper cup or small bowl & scoop it onto the toothbrush.

 I’m so excited about this that I had to share!

With gratitude,
Sharon Betzler, LMT

About e3 – the e3 Difference

May 18th, 2015

There is so much information available, we know it can be both confusing and sometimes overwhelming to choose an essential oil company. We are often asked to compare e3with other companies therefore, have created this post to outline what we feel is the e3 difference.

bottles cropEssential 3 is a full scope aromatherapy company focused on providing safe and effective Aromatherapy Solutions. All of our essential oils are tested by an independent lab to ensure quality. We define therapeutic quality as being free of pesticides, synthetics, stretching or adulteration of any kind, as well as the chemical constituents be in the required percentile range for their specific properties to be effective. Certificate of Analysis and SDS sheets are available upon request.

Essential 3 partners with farmers and distillers throughout the world; we do not grow or distill our own plant material. To produce the quantity and quality of essential oils that we offer requires a large volume of plant material, acres of land and for most plants, growing conditions that are only found in specific regions of the world, i.e. Frankincense, Lavender French High Altitude or Sandalwood.

Essential 3 is a private, family owned company; we do not have down lines or purchasing requirements i.e. minimum Rosemary 1order amounts or frequency of orders, we offer essential oil singles and blends in a variety of sizes.

Our staff is comprised of health care practitioners who have all studied clinical aromatherapy

We are committed to providing quality essential oils; personalized customer service and education on safe and appropriate essential oil use specific to each individual’s needs.  (i.e. Age, current health, skin condition, weight, medication, etc. will make a difference as to which oil and which application might be most beneficial.) Our customer base is comprised of individuals using essential oils to support their health and well-ness choices, spas, medi-spas, health care practitioners’ i.e. Massage Therapists, Acupuncturist, Chiropractors, PA, RN, NP and other CAM modality practitioners, as well as medical facilities (hospitals, hospice, etc.).

Our website, www.essentialthree.com, provides detailed information on each essential oil; latin name, country of origin, part of the plant used, extraction method, main biochemical components, properties, uses and safe application methods.

caryn choice picCaryn Gehlmann, owner and CEO of Essential 3 is a Certified Clinical Aromatherapist, she sits on the Asante Ashland Community CAM board, has worked closely with hospitals and hospice facilities to implement and  integrate sustainable, successful Aromatherapy programs; she is a member of the AIA research committee and has been a director on the Board of OHNA, Oregon Holistic Nurses.

Aromatherapy for Hot Flashes

May 1st, 2015

modified“Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin may redden, as if you’re blushing. Hot flashes can also cause profuse sweating and may leave you chilled.” Mayo Clinic

Hot Flashes Cooling and Balancing Skin Spritzer

4 ounces water in mister bottle
10 drops Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)
10 drop Geranium (Pelargonium roseum)
10 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Other suggested Essential Oils and Blend

Singles: Chamomile German, Chamomile Roman, Clary Sage, Eucalyptus Radiata, Fennel, Geranium, Lavender, Palmarosa, Peppermint, Rose, Yuzu

Synergy Blends:
Use 30 drops E3 Female Harmony or Head Soothe Synergy Blend instead of the single essential oils.


General Balancing:
Clary Sage, Fennel, Geranium, Lavender, Rose

Calming: Chamomile Roman, Clary Sage, Geranium, Lavender, Palmarosa, Rose

Cooling: Chamomile German, Eucalyptus Radiata, Lavender, Peppermint, Rose, Yuzu

Substitute any of the above essential oils and adjust proportions to create your desired aroma; as this spritzer will be used as a skin mist keep total drops between 10-40 drops per 4 oz water. If you include Peppermint start with no more than 5 drops in your blend and do not use in a blend for night time use; Peppermint can be irritating to the skin and may be too stimulating for night time use.  If you include Yuzu avoid exposure to sun and/or tanning beds. Always shake bottle before use and avoid contact with eyes.

If it is convenient, keep your spritzer bottle bottle in the refrigerator to increase its cooling action.

Epsom Salt Bath for Skin Care

March 20th, 2015

By Joni KeimJoni for NL


Epsom salts baths have been used for centuries and have many documented health benefits including skin care. Epsom salt is made up of magnesium sulfate which is an inorganic salt containing magnesium, sulfur and oxygen.

Spa MFIt has been shown that during an Epson Salt Bath (ESB) magnesium levels are increased in the body via transdermal absorption. An increase in magnesium can help to promote relaxation, stress reduction, ease muscle aches, pains, cramps and spasms, and topically it may calm outbreaks of eczema and psoriasis.

Epsom salts dissolved in a warm bath is great way to smooth, soften and help soothe dry, itchy skin. The standard use of Epsom salts is 1-2 cups in a warm tub of water. (Do not add or use soap.) Once in the water, pour in the Epsom salts, before they fully disolve, take some of the salts and gently massage any rough areas of your skin such as elbows, knees, and backs of arms to gently exfoliate skin. As the salts completely dissolve, stir the water around you. Relax and soak for about 15 minutes.  Rinse your skin off with plain water with a washcloth or shower because the salt residue can be drying. Apply a moisturizing lotion all over. Drink a tall glass of water to rehydrate.


To give your bath the added benefits of aromatherapy for skin care, you have many essential oils to choose from. Chamomile Roman, Lavender, Chamomile German, Blue Tansy, Frankincense, Geranium, Ylang Ylang Extra, Neroli, Rose, e3 Sandalwood Blend, e3 Skin Care Blend , are my favorites. They are ideal and luxurious in a bath. Simply add 4 to 8 drops of the essential oil to your Epsom Salt then add to the bath after you have immersed yourself.

 

References
http://www.mgwater.com/transdermal.shtml
http://www.ancient-minerals.com/transdermal-magnesium/